Day in D.C., the city of trees

The Metro train glides at a brisk and quiet pace. Inside is clean and full of beautiful and diverse people.

Forty-five minutes later I arrive at Union Station in Washington D.C. I find my way to the proper podium and announce my arrival. (I booked my tour online from my hotel,  www.dcducks.com.)  My duck (DUKW WWII amphibious) boat tour begins when our happy Captain Dave at the steering wheel/helm, welcomes us aboard.  He announces much of the US history as we drive by the Postal Museum, the Columbus monument, the freedom bell, the Hall of states (where every governor has an office.) Allegorical symbolism, monuments, statues, and memorials await at every turn (many of them were gifts to the USA from other countries.)

Constitution Avenue, originally a canal, now a bustling street, served the  builders as the passageway as they took the dome of the Capitol building, which was originally wooden, through the canal and up to the Capitol  building. The original dome burned in 1812 , was replaced with a cast-iron dome weighing 9 million pounds. On the top of the dome stands a woman statue, named Freedom.

The one building in Washington DC that has no public tours, but gladly sends you an invitation, is the IRS building. 

From almost everywhere you can see the Washington Monument, standing proudly  at 555 5/8 feet tall. Inside the building they are 897 steps. I can attest to that, as one time in 1993 I had to walk down them all.

After about thirty minutes, we headed to a launch ramp, where Captain Dave converted our “tour bus” into a water vessel with a flip of a switch. We were on the Pentagon Lagoon heading out to the Potomac River, where I got to drive the boat, which is from the World War II and built by women.

 

 

The azaleas are in full bloom. People are entertaining to watch. History is interesting inside the buildings. I learned many details from Capt. Dave, and confirmed them on www. aoc.gov.

Any thoughts?

Aloha🌺,

Denise

This blogger in the Washington DC azaleas

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